When will my bullmastiff quit eating my house?

He is 6 months old and still needs to be under strict parental supervision.

When does this subside?

When will be become more trustworthy?

he wont unless you make him. it is all up to you if the dog is allowed to get away with this he will never stop just get worse. what you need to do is anytime he does this he has to be disciplined Always look them in the eyes when disciplining this tells them you are boss. when he does wrong show him what was wrong and tell him bad or no what ever your word is then have his toy in your hand and give it too him and good. as you give it too him make sure he know that he can only chew on and tear up his toys. be strict do not let him get away with this not once. make sure he has his toys and being a mastiff I would get him a big piece of raw hide or bone also. you are just going to have to be strict Good luck

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9 Responses to When will my bullmastiff quit eating my house?

  1. SGT. Dillers Wifey says:

    Most odgs start to grow out of this stage after a year old, but make sure he has plenty to do to occupy him, buy rawhides and bones to keep him busy.
    References :

  2. Bree says:

    When you decide to take control and train him. Pups don’t grow into manners and good behavior, they need to learn it, just like human children.

    Now is the time to open the phone book to the yellow pages and start looking for a professional trainer or get researching to start training your dog yourself. This is the ONLY way he will ‘become more trustworthy’.
    References :

  3. Apricot Lover says:

    You need to baby proof your house and train him. You also need to be exercising him a lot.
    References :

  4. ciaobarbara says:

    it depends. The teething phase is just beginning and can last for 1.5 years. I did not let my collie out of my sight for the first 2 years. I also have a one year terrier and she can be let out for about 2 hours on her own while I am out but don’t trust her for more than that. He is eating your house because he needs something to chew on. Try to give him some toys that can work his jaw…there are many out there so you will have to do your research – some people are ok with rawhide and others are not – same with marrow bones – talk to your vet about appropriate chew toys and make sure you supervise his play.

    Good luck!
    References :

  5. JH15 says:

    I have 2 and they are naturally chewers. What I have found works well is to keep them busy or tired. Busy meaning buy raw hides, bones, and/or tuff toys that will keep their attention for as long as the treat last. Tired meaning take them on a walk when time permits to tired them out. Mine took 1 year to get mature enough to be trusted inside all the time, but trust me the time will come.
    References :

  6. Pitdog1 says:

    Your puppy will continue forever if he found the teething more comforting than anything else around him.Get him more occupied with playing ball with you or work his mind so that the stimulation of the gums is not as exciting as playing ball or doing some sort of agility or races.Take a training class and get him out and work with him.Good Luck!
    References :

  7. Lewys says:

    he wont unless you make him. it is all up to you if the dog is allowed to get away with this he will never stop just get worse. what you need to do is anytime he does this he has to be disciplined Always look them in the eyes when disciplining this tells them you are boss. when he does wrong show him what was wrong and tell him bad or no what ever your word is then have his toy in your hand and give it too him and good. as you give it too him make sure he know that he can only chew on and tear up his toys. be strict do not let him get away with this not once. make sure he has his toys and being a mastiff I would get him a big piece of raw hide or bone also. you are just going to have to be strict Good luck
    References :
    Trainer, Owner

  8. beth says:

    if he is eating your house, is he not getting enough exercise and stimulation? even though he may be getting exercised daily, maybe he needs walked several times a day? have you taken him to a puppy training class?

    have a variety of toys/tough chew bones (ORIGINAL Nylabones are the BEST) whenever he chews on something he’s not supposed to, don’t yell, just stick a nylabone in his mouth. do this consistently for a week and you will notice a change in habit.

    outside of the above, puppies are just puppies. most chill out a bit by 1-2 years of age. they have incredible energy.
    References :

  9. orfan says:

    At six months he’s still very much a puppy. You need to set strict ‘house rules’ for him, and get him into training. Parental supervision is good for a dog at this stage, for how long would you leave a six-month to a year-old child? You also need to find a way to get out his excess energy (without doing harm to his still-growing body). Look up trainers in the area, talk to friends, and get him into training. It will help your bond, and help your communication. Your trainer should also be able to help you with specific issues, such as barking, gnawing, etc. (eg, if teething, give semi-soft toys, NEVER RAWHIDES as the pieces may splinter and hurt his gums, and use vinegar or Bitter Apple on spots he’s gnawing, gate him in room(s) other than those in which he’s chewing). I’d look into Doggy Day Camp to wear him out – if he’s not at home he can’t destroy it, and the playing and socialization will be good for him and tire him out so he doesn’t have the energy to eat the house. Again ask your trainer, friends, etc, for recommendations, and visit them to get a feel for the place. You may look into additional outlets for getting his energy out – swimming, agility training, playing frisbee in the park, supervised playdates with friends, etc. Your vet may also have suggestions. Definitely talk to a vet before you start an exercise routine or anything, as too much exercise can cause injuries like stress fractures and dogs can overheat quckly. The more good advice the better.

    Establishing house rules and boundaries will be a good start for curbing his eating it. You may also try crate training (and yes they make crates big enough), but make sure you do it properly. It will take time to get him to know the command ‘kennel’/’crate’/’bed’ or whatever you use, and his time spent in it needs to be built up very slowly. A crate should not be seen as an alternative to training and exercise – he should NOT spend most of his day in one, and shouldn’t think of it as punishment. Most toys state on the packaging that they need to be used under supervision and that if broken or breaking they need to be removed and thrown away. Follow this advice. Also, make sure they are of proper size for him; he could choke and die on one that is too small. Knowledgable pet store staff and of course your vet and trainer could be of help.

    Never, ever punish your dog for something he did unless you catch him in the act. Dogs don’t have a sense of time and do not connect past and present actions. Also, a quick correction and distraction are usually all that is needed. If he’s caught in the act, a ‘time out’ in another area or his crate of only a few minutes can be issued, no more than five. Or, you could stop the behavior and get him focused on something else like a sit, down, stay, watch me – any command you are working on. A knowledgable trainer can give you specifics. He will calm down a bit as he grows out of the puppy stage, but part of it may be his natural personality and should be given outlets – training and exercise will help A LOT.

    Good luck
    References :
    dog training, working in dog day care, research paper about dog training